Shivervein contributes to H2SO4

Last year, I was invited to contribute a remix of the track “H2SO4” as part of a standalone Partition 36 EP release of the same name.

H2SO4 is the fifth EP from Partition 36. It features a minimalistic acid house track reminiscent of the past, two remixes, and a slamming new industrial/EBM track written specifically for a video game mod.human soul.

This EP has now been released with the Shivervein track “H2SO4 (1943)” as track #3. Shivervein is the sometimes-side-project of An Early Morning Letter, Displaced.

H2SO4 album page: http://www.partition36.com/discography/h2so4/

H2SO4 Bandcamp page: https://partition36.bandcamp.com/album/h-so

EC3 Contributor Interview: Jeffry Houser

jeffryhouser_EC3

Please start by telling us your name, the name of your project (if different), and any other contributors that make up the project as a whole.

I’m Jeffry Houser. I don’t have a project so much anymore, in that I just sometimes write and record songs for fun. Flying Closer to the Sun was one of the songs I wrote for February Album Writing Month. The purpose is to write and record a full album during the month of February. I wrote 19 songs; some good some bad. This is one of my favorites. All the recordings are here: http://fawm.org/fawmers/reboog711/.

What is the history of your particular aural endeavors? How did you get started working in this area?

When I graduated high school and went off to college I decided I wanted to learn guitar. So I rented one to bring with me. I spent four hours a day during my first semester learning every Nirvana song. Then I started writing stuff on my own. That lead to being in a band, called Lonely In Silence that was a powerful alt rock band. But, since love is often close to hate; we could barely stand each other and the band broke up. We had some awesome songs and it saddens me that many are not captured on tape in top form.

Later; I started an acoustic rock band called Far Cry Fly (http://www.farcryfly.com/) and our albums are up on Archive.org for all to download and enjoy. The band isn’t active formally, but ever once in a while we get together and record.

Tell us about your track for EC3. What is the creative process like for you?

Flying Closer to the Sun was written in the final days of February 2014. I had already completed 14 songs for February Album Writing Month and decided to sit down and see what I could come up with. Over the course of two days, I wrote three songs and this was one of them and it stuck with me.

To write; I often pick up the guitar and start playing. The lyrics come off the guitar riff. Then I pace together an arrangement and record it with guitar and scratch vocals. I’ll often replace the scratch vocals and do overdubs. This song is less produced than some of my others.

What sort of technologies and creative solutions do you enjoy working with? What does your primary work involve?

I run my own consulting business, so I jump around between projects and clients a lot. These days about half my ‘work’ is still based on Adobe Flex and the other half is HTML5 with AngularJS. I’ve put a lot of time over the past few years into learning AngularJS and recently released an AngularJS training course for Flex Developers (http://www.lifeafterflex.com). I’m really lucky in that I’ve been able to find multiple clients willing to give me the flexibility to explore different technologies.

My real desire is to do more mobile development, so I expect to focus my education efforts on that over the next year or so.

The Emergent Collective series was established to highlight people in the community who work in creative technologies and also produce music (not that these efforts are so dissimilar). How did you get involved in this Emergent Collective compilation?

I think I saw a tweet and the timing worked out in my schedule. I avoided it in past years due to other commitments, both personal and professional. This year the stars just aligned.

Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers? Projects you are working on or future appearances?

Nothing musical; but be sure to check out my AngularJS training course for Flex Developers at http://www.lifeafterflex.com. The books are available for free and for a bit more there are over 6 hours of screencasts on AngularJs. Even if you don’t know Flex; I’m told the Angular piece could stand alone.

The best way to find out what I’m up to is to watch me on twitter (reboog711) or follow my personal blog (www.jeffryhouser.com).

Emergent Collective Three
Listen to Jeffry Houser and others on Emergent Collective Three.

EC3 Contributor Interview: coderjun

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Please start by telling us your name, the name of your project (if different), and any other contributors that make up the project as a whole.

My name is Jun Heider and the name of my solo endeavors is “coderjun”. Sometimes, I have contributors, this time it was the submission of anonymous track art which I think looks most excellent.

What is the history of your particular aural endeavors? How did you get started working in this area?

I think the first time I started to dabble with music was when my father bough our family an Amiga 1000 while we were growing up. There was this really cool program called Deluxe Music Construction Set by Electronic Arts: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deluxe_Music_Construction_Set
To be quite frank, the sounds were shitty but it was really fun to camp out in my bedroom and play around with the program creating tracks as a grade schooler.

I got my first guitar for xmas when I was in eight grade. At the time all I wanted to do was learn U2 songs. I was really into the Joshua Tree. After that, throughout junior high and high school I played guitar, bass, and sang in tons of school time bands and also a bunch of high school bands with my buddies. The highlight was opening for Coffin Break at a Sadie Hawkins dance.

Between 92 and 95 I sang full time in the Tacoma, WA music scene. The band I was in was called Bucket. We were regionally successful, had a CD recorded by Jack Endino called Brother Fear which you can find on Spotify if you’re curious and we played over 200 shows in the Northwest… then we broke up… typical rock story…

After Bucket In 95 to 96 I played in a number of bands in both Washington state and Washington DC. After that round I found myself on a path into the tech world and haven’t looked back.

I like to keep balanced though, so since April 2009 until now I’ve played off an on with a band Machine Language (aka Compilers from EC1 and EC2), we started as an experimentation in interactive rock concert experiences, and you can read about that on codebass: http://codebass.com/2010/07/23/the-compilers-music-doesnt-just-meet-technology/

I also play solo acoustic/voice at open mics and cabarets around Denver from time to time.

Starting in 2010 or so after getting an inspirational influx of electronic music needs I started dabbling with pure electronic music and acoustic/electronic music hybrid. It’s a good geeky way to pass the time…

Tell us about your track for EC3. What is the creative process like for you?

My creative process varies. It highly depends on my mood as I’m sure it does for any creative. In regard to qapla’ I felt like composing something in my favorite iPad application, iMS-20: http://www.korg.com/us/products/software/ims_20_for_ipad/

You’ve heard of lean back experience… well that’s what iPad and iMS-20 are all about. I think I did 25% of my track on the couch in my living room and the other 75% lying in bed… haha!

What sort of technologies and creative solutions do you enjoy working with? What does your primary work involve?

I still love to work with Apache Flex…a lot. Also, over the last year and a half or so, I’ve rediscovered my roots in server-side technology, dig VMs and Vagrant, AWS, Heroku, and found a really cool balance of code vs. sysadmin in this technology called chef: http://www.getchef.com/

Usually my primary work involves some kind of video delivery and infrastructure consultancy, whether it is cross-platform video player development, delivery infrastructure design, or Adobe Media Server consulting and design. I also teach and have been teaching since 2005. Right now it’s Apache Flex or Adobe Media Server classes or training. Also in the process of getting certified to teach Varnish, a caching server technology.

Creative solutions… quite frankly I can’t design, draw, or pretty things up to save my life. That’s what the music is for. ;-)

The Emergent Collective series was established to highlight people in the community who work in creative technologies and also produce music (not that these efforts are so dissimilar). How did you get involved in this Emergent Collective compilation?

From EC1 this has been a really great idea. Luckily I am part of the ACP community and a Denver-ite so for once I had the right connections for find out about it!

Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers? Projects you are working on or future appearances?

Yeah, if you’re attending 360Flex this week come say hey. Otherwise, go follow me on soundcloud (music) or twitter (tech). I’m “coderjun” anywhere you find me.

Emergent Collective Three
Listen to coderjun and others on Emergent Collective Three.

EC3 Contributor Interview: Michael Clawson

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Please start by telling us your name, the name of your project (if different), and any other contributors that make up the project as a whole.

My name is Michael Clawson. I usually write music under that name at this time. If you consider a brontosaurus a contributor, well then, there you go.

What is the history of your particular aural endeavors? How did you get started working in this area?

My music history goes all the way back to my high school years when my Dad bought me my first electric guitar. It was a Les Paul silver sunburst, custom. My friend questioned my Dad’s wisdom, because, as he put it, “Clawson, you suck as a guitarist.” Well, yeah, I did, but in hindsight, that was the best thing my Dad could have done for me since I was able to grow into that fabulous instrument as my skills developed. I studied mostly progressive rock, formed a few bands with my younger brother, who is a killer drummer I might add. Later in college, I met a good friend of mine who was a wizard with computers. He was using an Amiga 1000 to control a rack of keyboards when I first auditioned for him. The sound was wonderful and full, and he was performing everything as a one-man band, literally. Long story short, he got me hooked on technology, specifically MIDI and sampling technology. We formed a club band and actually had great success playing 80s covers and our original compositions. I bought a MIDI synthesizer and began to record my own music with a Mac program named Vision by Opcode. Opcode was an early pioneer of merging digital audio with MIDI. They further upgraded their flagship program to support 2 tracks of Digital Audio. To get the audio into your Mac, you needed a Mac II and an expensive hardware add-on sound card. Being a college kid at the time, that option was way above my pay grade, so I spent the time creating MIDI songs on my Mac SE, and later in my friends studio where I had access to digital samplers. I created aural compositions for my sister, who was mastering in Modern Dance, filled with reverse guitars, keyboards and sound effects. It was a pleasure to explore new creative areas with experimental sounds and instrument combinations. As computer technology progressed, it was easier, and cheaper to record audio. Processing power increased, and I soon was layering multiple tracks of recorded audio and MIDI data in my own home studio. Today, this processing power is literally in my hands with programs like Garage Band for iPad, where I seem to be spending much of my creative time lately.

Tell us about your track for EC3. What is the creative process like for you?

I am a guitarist, so any opportunity I get to create an aural landscape for me to solo over, I’ll take it. So, as a result, I typically find an inspirational keyboard patch or drum rhythm and start building melodies and parts of songs until I am inspired to take the idea further. I actually like to sing and write lyrics, and I’m often inspired by more poetic and philosophical approaches to my songs. Lately, my process has been to start song in Garage Band on my iPad and create the basic idea, then later take it into the desktop version and further expand and finalize the idea.

What sort of technologies and creative solutions do you enjoy working with? What does your primary work involve?

I am a complete 100% Apple fanboy, so it is safe to say anything Apple related interests me. I have collected many guitar effects processors over the year. largely from Roland, and I have several guitars to inspire me with new sound approaches. I can play a little keyboards, largely to sequence parts, but when I need to approach another instrument, I just strap on my Roland guitar synthesizer and start playing a flute, trumpet, or pipe organ, for example. Loops and arpeggio plug-ins are also a great place for me to start. Of course, I think the question was what do I do for a living? I am a designer and coder, a so called hybrid, and I own my own boutique advertising agency that keeps me busy most of the time. I also love anything Adobe, since their tools have really developed over the years, and have helped me solve creative challenges for my clients. I am also a photographer, and enjoy taking and editing photos with my iPhone.

The Emergent Collective series was established to highlight people in the community who work in creative technologies and also produce music (not that these efforts are so dissimilar). How did you get involved in this Emergent Collective compilation?

Well, Joseph, I have to come clean here and confess that I started following you on Twitter probably about 2 years ago. I follow a lot of Adobe people and musicians. You were in both categories, like me, so it made sense to see what you were doing (not stalking). I think it was around that time that you released the first Emergent Collective, which I immediately purchased, and was very impressed and inspired with its approach. I suppose the rest is history after you asked me to contribute for this album, and well, here I am now.

Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers? Projects you are working on or future appearances?

I will continue to create since that is such a huge part of who I am. I’m currently writing a book on iPhoneography that I hope will be available by the end of the year.

Emergent Collective Three
Listen to Michael Clawson and others on Emergent Collective Three.

EC3 Contributor Interview: Co-Opera

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Please start by telling us your name, the name of your project (if different), and any other contributors that make up the project as a whole.

My name is Mike Brunt the project name is Co-Opera and involves a second person named Alexandra Bwye. We both compose, play and vocalize.

What is the history of your particular aural endeavors? How did you get started working in this area?

I was in a couple of groups in the 1960’s in England, blues groups, I was poor-ish and one night decided to do a Pete Townsend/Jimi Hendrix and broke the neck off my Hohfner violin bass which kept me out off playing for some time. About 4-5 years ago I met my current collaborator in Co-Opera, Alexandra Bwye and she is a trained classical pianist and from that she taught me how to use a piece of software which is both revolutionary and revelationary to us, it is called Propellerhead Reason. Since then we have released 8 albums and one EP.

Tell us about your track for EC3. What is the creative process like for you?

Our process is different as we can start from sounds in our heads, start by playing etc, in this case it was a drum pattern which started it and then the music part unraveled gradually, one layer building on another. The actual way we evolve pretty much evolve all of our music is via constant looping and listening and adding/changing.

What sort of technologies and creative solutions do you enjoy working with? What does your primary work involve?

As mentioned above we like Reason or Record, both are great for us and we use NCH Software tools also.

The Emergent Collective series was established to highlight people in the community who work in creative technologies and also produce music (not that these efforts are so dissimilar). How did you get involved in this Emergent Collective.

Via Vicky Ryder who pointed it out, yet I am always interested in our expanding creative community as I know of it.

Emergent Collective Three
Listen to Co-Opera and others on Emergent Collective Three.